Return to Sport – Training

When considering all aspects of Return to Sport, one thing the profession of physical therapy does a very poor job of (in my opinion) is addressing the fitness and training demands required of the athletic population.  In fact, I would argue that the medical community in general lacks guidance in this avenue.  We FAR too often tie the hands of our strength and conditioning professionals by telling them, “no cutting/pivoting,”…

Return to Sport – Testing

Last post I left off talking about the concepts of what Return to Sport means.  Now, let’s talk about what tests to use.  I would like to introduce several tests that allow us to comprehensively assess an athlete’s abilities and help to determine readiness to return to sports.  That said, There are SO MANY valuable tests and ways to measure things…but we may only have time, equipment & evidence to support a handful.…

Return To Sport – Foundation & Concepts

This topic is THE most talked about subject in all of sports medicine & rehab…and has been for some time now.  Once an athlete is injured, all anyone can talk about is “when can they play again?”  Athletes (and the rehab professionals working with them) want to get back to whatever sport as soon as possible.  There is enormous pressure to get back sooner and sooner and miss less and…

The Shoulder – Amazing & Complex (Part II)

Now, the front of the shoulder – it was left off last post.  The reason: without a stable shoulder blade, your “shoulder” doesn’t stand a chance of moving or feeling better. If the shoulder blade is sitting awkwardly or, more importantly moving awkwardly, you are predisposed to negative issues. It is typically the front of the shoulder that can become an issue because of overuse and lack of posterior support…

The Shoulder – Amazing & Complex (Part I)

Oh, the shoulder…where do I start?  I previously addressed the shoulder movement pattern, but feel I need to explain the shoulder in a little greater detail here.  This is not an anatomy lesson, so I don’t want to go into too much detail.  Just know it is complex, very mobile but highly unstable and therefore subject to injury.  It is comprised of the Glenohumeral joint (that is the typical ball…